Reprint from The Tech Edvocate

What makes an Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) unique is that it is designed for younger children and is family-oriented. An IFSP is a document that outlines a plan for young children who need early intervention services. It is customized for each child, as well as including a plan for the family. For instance, when children are receiving early intervention services, the family may also need the training to support their child’s needs.

Since an IFSP is customized for the individual, every IFSP will be different. As you begin the process of developing an IFSP, here are some apps and tools to help you.

Anatomy of an IFSP

The Understood Team has put together a complete guide to the various sections of the IFSP. The Anatomy is an

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New from Don Johnston!  Innovations like robot vacuums and self-driving cars are giving people time to spend in more useful ways. Quizbot is ready to do the same for quiz-building.

With Quizbot, teachers can build quizzes automatically from any text (online articles or PDFs) with one click. The accessible quiz is automatically put into Google Forms and scoring is automatic.

Build quizzes automatically from any text with one click. Automatic scoring through Google Forms shows instantly what is being comprehended.

How it Works

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The following are some apps that can help travelers with disabilities smooth the way.

Google Maps (iOS and Android) has an option for “wheelchair access” To access the “wheelchair accessible” routes, type your desired destination into Google Maps. Tap “Directions” then select the public transportation icon. Then tap “Options” and under the Routes section, you’ll find “wheelchair accessible” as a new route type.

Crowd-sourced apps such as AccessEarth will tell you how a business rates on everything from barrier-free entrances, to wheelchair-height tables and accessible restrooms.

Aaron Preece of the American Foundation for the Blind suggests these for people with visual impairments:

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By: Jenny Lay-Flurrie – Microsoft Chief Accessibility Officer

Microsoft announces new technology and resources for people with disabilities. The goal of GAAD is to get everyone talking, thinking and learning about accessibility. For us, it’s also about digging deep into how technology can empower the 1 billion people worldwide who have disabilities. Not only is it important that we do this for our customers and our employees, it’s also an exciting area for technology and innovation to drive incredible impact. In 2011, the World Health Organization changed the definition of disability to the result of a mismatch between what a person wants to achieve and the environment or society that he or she lives in. Technology can play a leading role in bridging the gap. It’s both exciting to think about the tremendous opportunity to empower and humbling to think about our responsibility to get it right.

Technology has human impact. It can empower people like Dan, a devoted gamer whose life was changed by an accident; Nori, who is passionate about Japanese culture and public speaking and has low vision; and Joseph, a first-year student who studies biology at Rochester Institute of Technology in New York and is deaf.

While we live our mission to empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more every day, on GAAD we are pleased to be announcing the Xbox Adaptive Controller, a new technology to help more gamers game. We’re highlighting AI for Accessibility, which provides opportunities for inventors and researchers to use AI to empower people with disabilities. We’re reimagining accessibility as an important issue we can tackle together through a short film. And we’re launching a new Microsoft Accessibility website to make it easy to find, discover and Read the remainder of this entry »

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By John Ramsay for ItProPortal

Innovations in technology are helping support workforces across the globe to become more efficient and alleviate the stress felt by workers. A prime example of this is the introduction of augmented reality to the property industry, as it allows individuals to view their furniture in a properly without physically moving it.

One sector that is under increasing pressure, due to factors such as budget cuts and high staff turnover, is the care sector. However, as technology evolves to become more intelligent, new developments are both reducing the stress of caregivers and giving the people who need care a better quality of life.

In the home

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By Cal Jeffrey (Techspot)

Microsoft just announced a new controller for the Xbox One that will bring accessibility to gaming for those with a variety of disabilities.

It is called the Xbox Adaptive Controller (XAC), and its design is not like anything you have ever seen. It looks a bit like a dual-turntable device that one would use to DJ a party. In fact, that is what I thought it was when I first saw pictures of it.

The minimalist design has two large circular pads, an over-sized directional control crossbar, and a few menu buttons. It has a headphone jack on the side as well as a USB port for connecting a separate joystick, but what sets the XAC apart are the 19 3.5mm jacks on the back of the device.

The ports can be used to connect a wide array of assistive technology including Read the remainder of this entry »

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By: Joe Rossignol (MacRumors Newsletter)

Apple announced that its Everyone Can Code curriculum is expanding to schools serving deaf, blind, or visually impaired students, starting with various locations in the United States in the fall.

Initial list of participating schools:

  • California School for the Blind (Fremont, CA)
  • California School for the Deaf (Fremont, CA)
  • District 75/Citywide Programs (New York, NY)
  • Florida School for the Deaf and the Blind (St. Augustine, FL)
  • Hadley Institute for the Blind and Visually Impaired (Winnetka, IL)
  • Perkins School for the Blind (Watertown, MA)
  • Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired (Austin, TX)
  • Texas School for the Deaf (Austin, TX)

Everyone Can Code enables students of all ages to learn how to code with Apple’s open source programming language Swift. The curriculum involves the iPad app Swift Playgrounds, which lets students use real code to solve puzzles and control characters, and the iBooks course App Development with Swift.

Apple has tailored Everyone Can Code to work with Read the remainder of this entry »

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By:  Jenny Lay-Flurrie – Microsoft Chief Accessibility Officer

Today we celebrate the seventh annual Global Accessibility Awareness Day and announce new technology and resources for people with disabilities. The goal of GAAD is to get everyone talking, thinking and learning about accessibility. For us, it’s also about digging deep into how technology can empower the 1 billion people worldwide who have disabilities. Not only is it important that we do this for our customers and our employees, it’s also an exciting area for technology and innovation to drive incredible impact. In 2011, the World Health Organization changed the definition of disability to the result of a mismatch between what a person wants to achieve and the environment or society that he or she lives in. Technology can play a leading role in bridging the gap. It’s both exciting to think about the tremendous opportunity to empower and humbling to think about our responsibility to get it right.

Technology has human impact. It can empower people like Dan, a devoted gamer whose life was changed by an accident; Nori, who is passionate about Japanese culture and public speaking and has low vision; and Joseph, a first-year student who studies biology at Rochester Institute of Technology in New York and is deaf.

While we live our mission to empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more every day, on GAAD we are pleased to be announcing the Xbox Adaptive Controller, a new technology to help more gamers game. We’re highlighting AI for Accessibility, which provides opportunities for Read the remainder of this entry »

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By Devindra Hardawar (Engadget)

One of Microsoft’s biggest announcements at Build this year is all about using artificial intelligence for social good. Through the new AI for Accessibility program, Microsoft has committed $25 million over the next five years to helping people with disabilities worldwide (a figure that currently sits at over one billion, according to The World Bank). Just like its AI for Earth initiative, which uses the technology for environmental innovations, the company will handle this program through investments, grants and expert assistance when necessary. And, as you’d expect, the AI solutions will also connect to Microsoft’s cloud services.

Specifically, Microsoft says the program will focus on accelerating the development of AI for Read the remainder of this entry »

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By Matthew Lynch (The Tech Edvocate)

The advances in technology could mean more for society than just new educational technology and virtual reality video games. People with disabilities are finding innovative ways to put artificial intelligence to work with their current conditions. As the science improves, assistive technology will continue producing new and improved platforms to help create a better standard of living for those individuals.
Are you interested in the myriad of ways that assistive technology is changing with the improved status of artificial intelligence? These four examples should give you a great idea of what’s possible when you integrate these two fields. Read the remainder of this entry »

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