Visual and Audio Cookbooks!

Posted February 13, 2017 By Lee Learson

Cooking is a fun and practical activity for everyone and an opportunity to not only increase independence, but also to put basic academic skills to use in a functional way. Determining what is needed, obtaining the ingredients and following directions to put it together are all important steps.

It not only allows individuals to be more independent, it also gives them an opportunity to put other skills like shopping and basic math to practical use. Using these skills in a real life situation, like cooking, can build self-confidence and self-reliance. And it’s fun! There will be spills and general messiness but the end result is worth it (and tasty too!).  

The following are some wonderful visual and audio cookbooks and links to on-line recipes to help you get you started. Read the remainder of this entry »

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Reprinted from AbleGamers Charity

We utilize fun to bring inclusion and improved quality of life for people with disabilities through the power of video games. 

With a combination of technologies such as mouth controllers, eye gaze, and special custokids playing video game mized controllers, we find a way for people to play video games no matter their disability. When our accessibility experts give assessments to determine the right set of equipment for each individual, we’re using the latest, bleeding edge technology to bridge the gap between ability and desire.

How We’re Making Fun… Read the remainder of this entry »

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Hearing Aid Comparison Guide

Posted January 27, 2017 By Lee Learson

If you, a family member or someone you know is considering hearing aids, where to start is often daunting. Consumer Affairs* (www.consumeraffairs.com ) has recently published a consumer resource about the Best Hearing Aids for 2017. The guide includes brand comparisons, important features, different types and hundreds of verified consumer reviews.

Over 36 million Americans experience some degree of hearing loss, and hearing aids – small sound amplification devices worn inside or around a person’s ear – are one of the most common ways people manage it. Today, the need for hearing aids is growing as more people are diagnosed with hearing loss each year.

 While there are many types of hearing aids and many causes of hearing loss, the purpose of a hearing aid is always the same: to amplify sound and improve the wearer’s quality of life. Hearing aids can vary in placement, features and pricing. The guide does a good job of comparing these products. The reviews from consumers and experts are useful, informative and a good resource as you begin to investigate the possibilities in this expanding market.

 *Please note that Consumer Affairs is not a government agency and charges a fee to companies to become accredited.

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(Note: Although this webinar series is specifically designed for Pediatricians, the resources listed below provide valuable information for educators, health care professionals and parents as well.)

The UConn UCEDD is collaborating with the Connecticut Department of Developmental Services and the Hezekiah Beardsley Connecticut Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics to offer a webinar series on Autism Spectrum Disorder. This webinar series is designed to connect state-level experts in various aspects of Autism Spectrum Disorder with Connecticut pediatricians to provide increased knowledge regarding the screening, diagnosis, and treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorder and how this impacts their role with children and families.

Over the course of the next year, six webinars will be offered on the following topics: Read the remainder of this entry »

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Apps for Creating Stories

Posted January 17, 2017 By Lee Learson

Looking for great story creating apps? Here’s a rundown (with links) of some of the best! Story telling is a great way to encourage kids to write and hear themselves speak too. It provides an opportunity for kids to be imaginative and creative while learning the foundations of writing and storytelling. Creating their own stories can be used not only for telling stories about events, but for writing social stories, sequencing daily living skills, creating schedules and so much more. The following are just a few of the wide variety of story creating apps available. Read the remainder of this entry »

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PresenceLearning, creator of the leading network of teletherapy providers in education, is launching a free, three-part webinar series for special education leaders and clinicians focused on big, new ideas that can positively impact student development, outcomes, and long term success.

For the first webinar on February 14, 2017, scholar, author, and speaker Dr. Lori Desautels will provide valuable insight about educational neuroscience and recognition of our schools as living systems. She’ll illuminate how and why educators, clinicians, and administrators must care for their own brains and hearts to bring about big change. Next up on March 30, 2017… Read the remainder of this entry »

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ABLEnow, the Virginia-sponsored ABLE savings program, opened for nationwide enrollment in late 2016. Virginia is among the first states in the country to open an ABLE program for eligible individuals living with disabilities.

 
On November 1, the State of Michigan launched its “MiABLE” program. MiABLE is a part of a national program each state is supposed to launch, offering enrollment to qualified individuals with disabilities both in Michigan and throughout the country. MiABLE allows qualified individuals with disabilities to save up to $14,000 a year in an ABLE account without jeopardizing their eligibility for Read the remainder of this entry »

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Gift Giving Guide for Kids with Special Needs

Posted November 28, 2016 By Lee Learson
By Glenda Hampton Anderson, Education/Assistive Technology Consultant.

As stated by Cari Jean, “It’s no secret that kids love toys. They see a new one on a television advertisement and tell their parents, “I want that!” If kids had their way, they would have every toy imaginable. Toys can be a great way for kids to use motor skills, to learn to play by themselves and to learn to share with others. But what happens when children do not have the required skills to play with their toys? Kids with special needs may not be able to play with many of the mainstream toys available. That’s why there is a market for adaptive toys for special needs children.” Read the remainder of this entry »

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By Aviva Rutkin

No braille? No problem. A new device lets blind people read by popping a miniature camera on their fingertip.

To read printed material, many visually impaired people rely on mobile apps like KNFB Reader that translate text to speech. Snap a picture and the app reads the page aloud. But users sometimes find it difficult to ensure that their photo captures all of the text, and these apps can have trouble parsing a complex layout, such as a newspaper or restaurant menu.

figure1b“We want to empower end users to accomplish these activities of daily living through technology,” says Jon Froehlichat the University of Maryland.

Froehlich and his colleagues have developed a device, nicknamed HandSight,  that uses a tiny camera originally developed for endoscopies. Measuring just one millimetre across, the camera sits on the tip of the finger while the rest of the device clasps onto the finger and wrist. As the user follows a line of text with their finger, a nearby computer reads it out. Audio cues or haptic buzzes help the user make their way through the text, for example changing pitch or gently vibrating to help nudge their finger into the correct position. Read the remainder of this entry »

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NASA Internships for Students with Disabilities

Posted November 7, 2016 By Lee Learson

NASA is looking to increase the number of students with disabilities pursuing science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) careers through their regular internship programs. This is not a program for students with disabilities.  NASE is trying to recruit more students with disabilities into their regular internship programs. Disability means both physical and mental disabilities. Internships are a good way to get real-world experience. However, this is not an employment program. NASA jobs can be found at <http://www.usajobs.gov>. Students can apply for Summer 2017 internships now! The deadline for submitting applications will be Wednesday, March 1, 2017. NASA will begin extending offers to students in mid-to-late January and will continue until all positions are filled. If you would like to subscribe to an announcement-only list about NASA internships for persons with disabilities, please send an E-mail to nasainterns-request@freelists.org with ‘subscribe’ in the Subject field, OR by visiting the list page at http://www.freelists.org/list/nasainterns. Read the remainder of this entry »

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