Resources Archive

New App Wheels From CALL Scotland

Posted October 31, 2017 By Lee Learson

CALL Scotland has just released new and updated App Wheels. Separate app wheels for iPad and Android users are available on their website and they’re free!

The ‘Wheel of Apps’ are not comprehensive, but attempt to identify relevant, useful apps and to categorize them according to difficulties faced by people with learning and communication disabilities. Note that some apps address a range of difficulties. To save space, they have not placed individual apps into multiple categories, but have listed them under a single category that is particularly relevant to the app. Links on the electronic version are ‘clickable’ and will take you to iTunes, where you can find out more about the individual apps.

Their newest additions for iPad users are: Read the remainder of this entry »

Be the first to comment

The National Center on Educational Outcomes (NCEO) released four resources for special education teachers, administrators and advocates.

Educators Experiences With and Attitudes Towards Accessibility Features and Accommodations explores results of a survey about educators’ familiarity with and attitudes toward accessibility features and accommodations. Most respondents reported that they work with students who use accessibility accommodations, which they believe to have a positive impact on educational outcomes.

NCEO State Surveys: 2016 Survey of States: State Activities Amid Evolving Educational Policies provides a snapshot of the new initiatives, trends, accomplishments, and emerging issues during a period of new education laws and initiatives. States addressed the need for inclusive assessments while facing requirements for assessments and accountability.

Forum on Text Readers for Everyone on All Tests: Getting a Handle on What This Means reports on a forum that brought together state departments of education, school districts, testing and testing-related companies, and other educational organizations to discuss the availability of text readers for everyone on tests, the differences in terminology for text readers, ways to develop common language around text readers, and the challenges associated.

NCEO Brief: Meeting the Needs of ELs with Disabilities in Your State: Making EL Exit Decisions (#13) highlights the numbers and characteristics of English learners (EL) with disabilities and current decision-making processes for exiting these students from EL services. It provides recommendations for states as they support districts and schools in making appropriate exit decisions for ELs with disabilities.

Be the first to comment

The Center on Technology and Disability has a new resource paper out on selecting assistive technology with students and young adults. This resource helps families to get teens and young adults involved in learning about and selecting assistive technology. An important goal for older students is to understand the areas in which technology can support them in their educational and employment goals. This enables students to advocate for themselves, and to take an active role in selecting assistive technology to address their needs.  This is a downloadable resource on the CTD website  .

The CTD website has a great library of resources including Early Childhood, Education K-12, Student & Family Support, Transition and State & Local Resources!

Be the first to comment

A New Free E-Book from Make Beliefs Comix

Posted June 14, 2017 By Lee Learson

“Plant Your Dream Seeds: A Way to Grow Hope in Your Life” can be used by students to express in writing their deepest and hopes and dreams. This book of writing prompts is the latest addition to the interactive books section of MakeBeliefsComix.com and can be downloaded at: http://www.makebeliefscomix.com/eBooks/  Just click on the cover.

On its pages students will find writing prompts to help them think about the important things that they want to see happen in their lives.  By filling in the pages they will be able to Read the remainder of this entry »

Be the first to comment

Written by Keith Lambert, Education World Associate Contributing Editor. Lambert is an English / Language Arts teacher in Connecticut (Reprint from Education World)

In the new age of technology and the push for 21st century skills in our classrooms, it’s easy for teachers to feel intimidated. New tech appears every day, but “new” tech doesn’t always mean “better” tech. How do we sort through it all? On top of that, much of this new tech requires resources and funding that might not yet be available to school districts. Math teachers, in particular, face a challenging task of wanting to integrate computer literacy, while still teaching and supporting many of the foundational skills for math work. Students often need to show their work, which, without tablets, can be a challenge on a digital forum. The wide variety of math software available on the market today tends to require a separate type of literacy altogether, which can be both tough to learn and time-intensive. Khan has been revolutionary in differentiating math learning, supplying both video lessons and a vast amount of practice for students, easily monitored and facilitated by teachers. 

However, what about interactive, manipulatable math tools that support learning? Where are the digital math support programs that can assist in math learning, as opposed to outsourcing the direct teaching to the device? More importantly, can our students access them without pricey licensing fees, new hardware, or complicated apps? Today, Education World shares three free easy-to-use sites that assist math learning in the teacher-facilitated modern classroom.

 

1.  Desmos

Not only does Desmos provide free online four-function, scientific, and graphing calculators for student use (no more losing your calculator), it carries a wide variety of full interactive—almost game-like—lessons. Providing nothing more than your email, Desmos allows teachers to Read the remainder of this entry »

Be the first to comment

Many of us use Microsoft Office products on a daily basis. Writing documents, creating spreadsheets, sending and receiving emails, and creating and presenting presentations is a part of everyone’s life. Word, Excel, Outlook, and PowerPoint makes things easier for us!

Although it is important that we present good content in attractive, easy, and readable formats, it is equally important to make our content accessible for people with disabilities.

Fortunately, all Microsoft Office products have built in capabilities to make our content accessible. In addition, Microsoft also provides rules and best practices, and helps us check our content with the Accessibility Checker and other tools (like Color Contrast Analyzer) to ensure content follows accessibility guidelines.

Below you will find four different links that will show you how to create accessible content with Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook. They are short, and easy to read but give a plethora of information on how content can be made accessible with just a few clicks. 

Direct links to accessibility guides:

Microsoft Word

Microsoft Excel

Microsoft PowerPoint

Microsoft Outlook

 

Be the first to comment

ShortcutWorld.com is an open, wiki-style Reference Database for Keyboard Shortcuts. Using Keyboard Shortcuts on a daily basis is the mother of all productivity techniques. With this project, ShortcutWorld.com is building an open Hotkey Reference Database with the goal to cover as many Applications on as many Platforms and in as many Languages as possible.

Their goal is to get millions of users out there to be more productive. Please read the Frequently Asked Questions to learn more how the site works and how you can contribute.

Here’s an example of what’s available on the site… Read the remainder of this entry »

Be the first to comment

App Ed Review Roundup: Multicultural Apps and a Website

Posted March 10, 2017 By Lee Learson

by Todd & Alex from AppEdReview (reprint from EmergingEdTech)

Open Your Students up to a new Perspective With These Multicultural App Experiences

Multicultural EdTech may not get as much attention as some other topics in the field, but developers have created some really innovative apps and websites to engage students in this topic. In our communities, we have so much diversity and recognizing it in our classroom can be a powerful learning experience for our students. The challenge, however, can be that teachers may need support regarding how to use EdTech for those purposes. With that in mind, we sorted through our review database and identified three apps and a website that directly engage this topic and that teachers can use easily! Read the remainder of this entry »

Be the first to comment

Visual and Audio Cookbooks!

Posted February 13, 2017 By Lee Learson

Cooking is a fun and practical activity for everyone and an opportunity to not only increase independence, but also to put basic academic skills to use in a functional way. Determining what is needed, obtaining the ingredients and following directions to put it together are all important steps.

It not only allows individuals to be more independent, it also gives them an opportunity to put other skills like shopping and basic math to practical use. Using these skills in a real life situation, like cooking, can build self-confidence and self-reliance. And it’s fun! There will be spills and general messiness but the end result is worth it (and tasty too!).  

The following are some wonderful visual and audio cookbooks and links to on-line recipes to help you get you started. Read the remainder of this entry »

Be the first to comment

Hearing Aid Comparison Guide

Posted January 27, 2017 By Lee Learson

If you, a family member or someone you know is considering hearing aids, where to start is often daunting. Consumer Affairs* (www.consumeraffairs.com ) has recently published a consumer resource about the Best Hearing Aids for 2017. The guide includes brand comparisons, important features, different types and hundreds of verified consumer reviews.

Over 36 million Americans experience some degree of hearing loss, and hearing aids – small sound amplification devices worn inside or around a person’s ear – are one of the most common ways people manage it. Today, the need for hearing aids is growing as more people are diagnosed with hearing loss each year.

 While there are many types of hearing aids and many causes of hearing loss, the purpose of a hearing aid is always the same: to amplify sound and improve the wearer’s quality of life. Hearing aids can vary in placement, features and pricing. The guide does a good job of comparing these products. The reviews from consumers and experts are useful, informative and a good resource as you begin to investigate the possibilities in this expanding market.

 *Please note that Consumer Affairs is not a government agency and charges a fee to companies to become accredited.

Be the first to comment